Writing the Basic Analytical Essay: Part Three

By Dr. Rosette Liberman, www.cooperhillstylebook.com The Body This copyrighted article is the third of a series that teaches students how to write an effective essay. Parts One and Two are available at http://cooperhillstylebook.com/archive/ How many paragraphs should an essay contain? There is no absolute answer to this question. It arises because of an arbitrary model called “the 5-paragraph essay.” People who talk about essays that...

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Writing the Basic Analytical Essay: Part Two

  The Introduction   By Dr. Rosette Liberman, www.cooperhillstylebook.com   This copyrighted article is the second of a series that teaches students how to write an effective essay.  The first installment, Writing the Basic Analytical Essay Part One, is available at http://cooperhillstylebook.com/archive/  Function of the Introduction The Introduction hooks the reader’s interest in the topic or theme of the essay. The...

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Analytical Grammar: Complete English Courses for Success

www.analyticalgrammar.com  (919)783-0795 3810-201 Lunceston Way Raleigh, NC 27613 By Michael Leppert Jr. Analytical Grammar, 11 “weekly” lessons Gr 4-5  Jr. AG Mechanics supplemental book Beyond the Book Report & Essay and Research Paper – a middle-school-age writing course Analytical Grammar – 2-year or 3-year course, books & DVD lessons and reinforcement & review materials, Gr 6-12 _______________________ Analytical...

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What if I’m Not a Grammarian or a Particularly Good Writer?

By Rosette Liberman, co-author of The Cooperhill Style Book, http://cooperhillstylebook.com/ All parents ask themselves this question when they try to help their high schoolers revise their writing. After all, for most of us it’s been a long time since high school English. We ask ourselves should this be: who or whom? lie or lay? me or I? like or as? bring or take? different than or different from? On a more advanced level, we want to...

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Pardon Me, Madam, but Your Participle Is Dangling
Oct22

Pardon Me, Madam, but Your Participle Is Dangling

www.analyticalgrammar.com by Erin Karl, Analytical Grammar Many of us have heard the phrase “dangling participle.” Do you know what one actually is? A participle is a verbal. It LOOKS “verbish,” but actually functions as an adjective. Therefore it needs to be right next to the noun it modifies. When that doesn’t happen, it’s considered dangling. It can lead to some very funny situations. There are...

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